Isometric Studio

Princeton University Fields Center

Princeton University Fields Center

Visual IdentityPublicationExhibitionWebsite

 

Identity and spatial graphics for Princeton University student center addressing race, class, privilege, and culture

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We’re Here. We’ve Been Here. We Are Loved.

The Carl A. Fields Center challenges Princeton students to confront institutional racism and classism through collaborative discourse and action. Isometric created a visual identity and spatial graphics that frame the experiences of students of color past and present on the walls of the Center’s historic architecture. The design makes minority voices heard and a marginalized history visible, projecting new possibilities for a better, shared future.

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A Feeling of Home

In the midst of a national crisis about inclusion and activism on college campuses, Princeton University invited Isometric to create the visual identity and spatial graphics for a student center named after Carl A. Fields, the first African American dean at an Ivy League University.

We began the design process by asking students to take us to campus locations where they felt most at home. We interviewed and photographed them as raw materials for design, creating visual evidence that people of color belong at Princeton University.

View full set of portraits

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“When you walk in, you notice you’re comfortable being there, which is not how I feel in other spaces on campus. We feel like we are valued there, our identities are valued, and our experiences are valued.”
—Kauribel Javier ’19, Princeton Student
“The reclaiming and ownership of the space really resonates with the students, and they feel it now, so therefore they behave differently in terms of how they actually utilize the space.”
—Rochelle Calhoun, Vice President for Campus Life